Weight Management

 Adult Obesity in the United States

Updated September 1, 2016: According to the most recent data, adult obesity rates now exceed 35 percent in four states, 30 percent in 25 states and are above 20 percent in all states. Louisiana has the highest adult obesity rate at 36.2 percent and Colorado has the lowest at 20.2 percent. U.S. adult obesity rates decreased in four states (Minnesota, Montana, New York and Ohio), increased in two (Kansas and Kentucky) and remained stable in the rest, between 2014 and 2015. This marks the first time in the past decade that any states have experienced decreases — aside from a decline in Washington, D.C. in 2010.

Adult Obesity Rate by State, 2015

stateofobesity2016

Youngatheart_TipSheet

Trust for America’s Health is a non-profit, non-partisan organization dedicated to saving lives by protecting the health of every community and working to make disease prevention a national priority. www.healthyamericans.org

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation focuses on the pressing health and health care issues facing our country. As the nation’s largest philanthropy devoted exclusively to improving the health and health care of all Americans, the Foundation works with a diverse group of organizations and individuals to identify solutions and achieve comprehensive, meaningful and timely change. For more than 35 years the Foundation has brought experience, commitment, and a rigorous, balanced approach to the problems that affect the health and health care of those it serves. Helping Americans lead healthier lives and get the care they need–the Foundation expects to make a difference in our lifetime. For more information, visit www.rwjf.org.

A new study shows that obese workers have higher health costs than smokers.

Move More, Eat Less. In this sedentary society of ours, there has been a progressive decline in physical activity and a concomitant increase in weight gain despite multiple warnings from governmental agencies and a large and ever-increasing number of scientific publications recommending much greater amounts of physical activity and exercise, along with a reduction of caloric intake. Eat Smart Move More Weigh Less

Eat more weigh less

 

What foods will fill me up?

To be able to cut calories without eating less and feeling hungry, you need to replace some higher calorie foods with foods that are lower in calories and fat and will fill you up. In general, this means foods with lots of water and fiber in them. The chart below will help you make smart food choices that are part of a healthy eating plan.

These foods will fill you up with less calories. Choose them more often… These foods can pack more calories into each bite. Choose them less often…
Fruits and Vegetables
(prepared without added fat)
Fried foods
Spinach, broccoli, tomato, carrots, watermelon, berries, apples Eggs fried in butter, fried vegetables, French fries
Low-fat and fat-free milk products Full-fat milk products
Low- or fat-free milk, low or fat-free yogurt,
low- or fat-free cottage cheese
Full-fat cheese, full-fat ice cream,
whole and 2% milk
Broth-based soup Dry snack foods
Vegetable-based soups, soups with chicken or beef broth, tomato soups (without cream) Crackers or pretzels, cookies, chips, dried fruits
Whole grains Higher-fat and higher-sugar foods
Brown rice, whole wheat bread, whole wheat
pastas, popcorn
Croissants,margarine, shortening and butter,
doughnuts, candy bars, cakes and pastries
Lean meat, poultry and fish Fatty cuts of meat
Grilled salmon, chicken breast without skin,
ground beef (lean or extra lean)
Bacon, brisket, ground beef (regular)
Legumes (beans and peas)
Black, red kidney and pinto beans (without added fat), green peas, black-eyed peas


A healthy eating plan is one that —

  • Emphasizes fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and fat free or low-fat milk and milk products.
  • Includes lean meats, poultry, fish, beans, eggs, and nuts.
  • Is low in saturated fats, trans fats, cholesterol, salt (sodium), and added sugars.
  • Stays within your calorie needs.

Planning Meals